• ACUTE URINARY TRACT INFECTION [UTI] symptoms, causes, Treatment

    Condition is characterized by hectic rise of temperature, rigor, loin pain, painful and frequent micturition. A urinary tract infection is an infection that begins in your urinary system. Your urinary system is composed of the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra. Any part of your urinary system can become infected, but most infections involve the lower urinary tract — the bladder and the urethra.

    Women are at greater risk of developing a urinary tract infection than are men. A urinary tract infection limited to your bladder can be painful and annoying. However, serious consequences can occur if a urinary tract infection spreads to your kidneys.

    Antibiotics are the typical treatment for a urinary tract infection. But you can take steps to reduce your chance of getting a urinary tract infection in the first place.

    ETIOLOGY (CAUSES OF ACUTE URINARY TRACT INFECTION)

    Causative organisms

    • E. Coil.
    • Staphylococci.
    • Kiebsiella.
    • Candida.
    • Proteus.
    • Enterococci.
    • Infection of the bladder (cystitis)
    • Infection of the urethra (urethritis)

    Predisposing causes

    • Female sex.
    •  Enlarged prostate.
    • Neuropathic bladder.
    •  Urinary tract calculi.
    •  Polycystic kidney disease.
    • Diabetes mellitus.
    • Vesico-ureteric reflex.
    • Bladder catheterization.

    CLINICAL FEATURES OF ACUTE URINARY TRACT INFECTION
    Symptoms –
    Urinary tract infections don’t always cause signs and symptoms, but when they do they can include:

    • Onset: sudden.
    • Fever, with rigors.
    • Malaise.
    • Nausea, vomiting.
    • Pain in loins, flanks.
    • Frequent, burning urination.
    • A strong, persistent urge to urinate
    • A burning sensation when urinating
    • Passing frequent, small amounts of urine
    • Urine that appears cloudy
    • Pelvic pain, in women
    • Rectal pain, in men
    • Strong-smelling urine
    • Urine that appears bright pink or cola colored — a sign of blood in the urine
    • Dysuria.
    • Haematuria.

    Signs
    – Temperature: raised.
    – Pulse: rapid.
    – Blood pressure: normal.
    – Tenderness at renal angle (pyelonephritis).
    – Tenderness at suprapubic region (cystitis).

    COMPLICATION
    – Recurrent/chronic infection.

    Risk factors
    Some people appear to be more likely than are others to develop urinary tract infections. Risk factors include:

    • Being female. Urinary tract infections are very common in women, and many women will experience more than one. A key reason is their anatomy. Women have a shorter urethra, which cuts down on the distance bacteria must travel to reach the bladder.
    • Being sexually active. Women who are sexually active tend to have more urinary tract infections than women who aren’t sexually active.
    • Using certain types of birth control. Women who use diaphragms for birth control also may be at higher risk, as may women who use spermicidal agents.
    • Undergoing menopause. After menopause, urinary tract infections may become more common because the lack of estrogen causes changes in the urinary tract that make it more vulnerable to infection.
    • Having urinary tract abnormalities. Babies born with urinary tract abnormalities that don’t allow urine to leave the body or cause urine to back up in the urethra have an increased risk of urinary tract infections.
    • Having blockages in the urinary tract. Kidney stones or an enlarged prostate can trap urine in the bladder and increase the risk of urinary tract infection.
    • Having a suppressed immune system. Diabetes and other diseases that impair the immune system — the body’s defense against germs — can increase the risk of urinary tract infections.
    • Using a catheter to urinate. People who can’t urinate on their own and use a tube (catheter) to urinate have an increased risk of urinary tract infections. This may include people who are hospitalized, people with neurological problems that make it difficult to control their ability to urinate and people who are paralyzed.

    INVESTIGATIONS OF ACUTE URINARY TRACT INFECTION
    Blood

    – TLC: leucocytosis.
    – DLC: increased polymorphs.
    Urine
    – Volume: variable.
    – Colour: turbid.
    – Reaction: strong acid.
    – Albumin: traces.
    Microscopic
    . Pus cells: plenty.
    . RBC’s: moderate.
    . Epithelial cells: moderate.
    . Organisms: plenty.

    PROGNOSIS
    Good with non-obstructive etiology.

    MIASMATIC CLEAVAGE
    – Acute phase of chronic sycotic disorder.

    THERAPEUTIC AIM
    – To treat symptomaticaly.
    – Treat to cure.
    – Identify and treat the cause if possible.

    GENERAL MANAGEMENT
    – Bed rest.
    – Plenty of fluids.
    – Regular voiding of urine.
    – Maintain alkalinfty of urine.
    – Local hygiene.

    HOMOEOPATHIC  TREATMENT OF ACUTE URINARY TRACT INFECTION [AUI]

    Intercurrent
    – Lycopodium.
    – Sulphur.
    – Thuja Oc.
    Symptomatic
    – Apis Mel.
    – Berberis Vulgaris.
    – Cantharis.
    – Hydrangea.
    – Pareira Brava.
    – Sarsaparilla.

    Other Drugs:
    Chimaphila: Urging to micturate, urine turbid, offensive, containing bloody mucus. Burning and scalding during micturition. Must strain before flow comes.

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    Categories: Genitourinary Disease

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